Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Sulfur Dioxide in Wines

This is taken directly from Wikipedia .

In winemaking

Sulfur dioxide is an important compound in winemaking, and is designated as parts per million in wine, E number: E220.[4] It is present even in so-called unsulfurated wine at concentrations of up to 10 milligrams per litre.[5] It serves as an antibiotic andantioxidant, protecting wine from spoilage by bacteria and oxidation. Its antimicrobial action also helps to minimize volatile acidity. Sulfur dioxide is responsible for the words "contains sulfites" found on wine labels.

Sulfur dioxide exists in wine in free and bound forms, and the combination are referred to as total SO2. Binding, for instance to the carbonyl group of acetaldehyde, varies with the wine in question. The free form exists in equilibrium between molecular SO2(as a dissolved gas) and bisulfite ion, which is in turn in equilibrium with sulfite ion. These equilibria depend on the pH of the wine. Lower pH shifts the equilibrium towards molecular (gaseous) SO2, which is the active form, while at higher pH more SO2 is found in the inactive sulfite and bisulfite forms. It is the molecular SO2 which is active as an antimicrobial and antioxidant, and this is also the form which may be perceived as a pungent odour at high levels. Wines with total SO2 concentrations below 10 ppm do not require "contains sulfites" on the label by US and EU laws. The upper limit of total SO2 allowed in wine in the US is 350 ppm; in the EU it is 160 ppm for red wines and 210 ppm for white and rosé wines. In low concentrations SO2 is mostly undetectable in wine, but at free SO2 concentrations over 50ppm, SO2 becomes evident in the nose and taste of wine.[citation needed]

SO2 is also a very important compound in winery sanitation. Wineries and equipment must be kept clean, and because bleach cannot be used in a winery[citation needed], a mixture of SO2, water, and citric acid is commonly used to clean and sanitize equipment. Compounds of ozone (O3) are now used extensively as cleaning products in wineries[citation needed] due to their efficiency, and because these compounds do not affect the wine or equipment.

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